Posted on

Fractal is Dance

Fractal geometry is characterized by self similarity and endless iteration. Using dance, the human experiences the fractal as a simple form that varies by repeating an infinite range of combinations. Using this experimental process, dance interrelates all the human systems and has the outcome of simplifying the entire experience in a melodic form of metaphor.

Dance is a friendly entry point for using the fractal. Actually dance is already built on the fractal with its full experience in every direction, every mood, every dynamic, every rhythm.

Dance is defined as the principles that were selected through evolution and hard wired along with music into the earliest humans. Dance movement is similar to music which uses only twelve notes and is infinitely able to express in melodic statements the unity of a person, a generation, a people.

The artistic process like the scientific process is built on simple elements that are combined into an infinite number of experiments. Dance deserves our focus because it uniquely interconnects every human system physical, personal, motivational. Dance goes beyond mechanics to the quality of movement and to the interrelationship of emotion and the building of the self.

Fractal concepts are applied in dance by the use of pattern, interconnecting signals throughout the entire person through perception, rhythm, timber, and melody.

Pattern are added to pattern down to the smallest size and to the slowest speed. Basic shapes are triangles and spirals.

Signals are differentiated through the nervous and limbic systems. Signals initiated from specific areas of the spine define movement qualities and dynamics of mood and emotion.

Quality is defined as variations of initiation and extension giving concepts such as sustained or staccato, flicking and floating.

Dynamics is a use of increase and decrease, emphasis to initiate force or ease.

Anticipation precedes initiation with either arc or continuing line. The variations interrelate the processes of perception, integration of new forms as they emerge, and the process of metaphor to simplify and express the building of the self and the community.

Rhythms are constructed of sound and silence. Rhythms are visualized with shape using a binary mode made of short and long durations.

Timber is identified with imagery of sensation, color and taste.

Melody is the formation of a metaphor to represent a person, a people.

Perception differentiates incoming signals and builds awareness and interconnection of each human system. Perception may begin with the eyes, ears, nose, taste, skin, then progress to the sense of chemical and electrical modulations within the body, then may become interrelated to the processes of anticipating and initiating transformations and finally to the building of the self through metaphor. Perception may be within a range of both familiar or unfamiliar experience. All experiences are integrated through fractal processes of identifying simple forms, varying these forms in infinite repetition of combinations.
Tim Hurst 09/06/15

Posted on

Eye Body Integration

I experiment with eye movements to reconcile the two sides of my body. So I close one eye and move the other. I vary my movement and stillness, I spin, I lay down, I float in the bath. I sing to activate the right vocal chord while moving either eye.

The result is a vulnerable feeling. New territory. New integration.

I have to add an image of filling and emptying myself along with the eye movement. This image is more than an inhale and exhale but similar in the wave like motion of anticipating a rise and a fall. This image reminds me of moments when I feel more certain and comforts me that being vulnerable rises and dissipates the same way that being certain does.

To give a little background, I have found areas of my myself that need to be sewn back together. These areas are my sense perception of right and left body, specific muscles along my right side, my right vocal chord that sometimes vibrates and sometimes does not.

To reach these areas, I experiment with one simple movement of my eyes that I identify as fractal movement. I begin with a simple curved line and add a loop to the line, then I add a loop to that loop, and so on. I rotate the entire movement in as if the entire shape were spiraling in space. The movement becomes an improvisation using these components and though it sounds complex, the movement becomes very simple use of curves and loops.
Tim Hurst 11/13/17

Posted on

What’s a Brain Split to a Dancer?

In a movement meditation I came across the reason my mind seems to freeze. It is the reason I apply too much force when trying to learn new patterns and why I retreat to improvisation that allows space for me to try variations of the pattern.

Playing with eye movements, I followed one hand with one eye and then closing that eye followed my hand with the other eye. I discovered two completely different worlds in my experience of each eye. My left eye followed an expansive fluid flowing world. My left eye moved easily in all directions and my emotion was joyous and curious. My right eye was limited in its movement, resisting peripheral movement.

Comparing the two eyes in a panoramic movement from one side to the other, I again felt the difference. With my left eye, I felt the fluidity of movement and the ability to vary the speed from extremely slow to fast. With my right eye, there was more limitation. I was surprised that every action seemed to be a command with a pause between each directed movement. The effect was jerky and abrupt movement.

From the Anat Baniel Method, the description of this difference might mean a problem with my brain mapping my body. Baniel suggests that recognizing differences in movement is a first step to remapping the brain.

Following her process, I brought attention to my two eyes and began to build the puzzle pieces that would distinguish the different experiences of my left eye and right eye. It is almost like conversing with both experiences gives the brain the time to map the difference and begin an integration period that connects those areas of the brain.

The difficulty became apparent in the panic feelings I felt when exploring the experiences of my right eye. I needed some movement that would allow me to follow my right eye without building more panic.

I chose an image of fractal movement that begins as purposeful and immediately follows multiple variations. My wish is that with this image I can distinguish the differences in the experiences of using both eyes.

Fractal movement begins with a simple curved movement. The same movement is repeated with an added curve somewhere near the middle of the move. The variation can be a bump or a semicircle or a loop. The second movement with the variation is repeated adding another curve on the first variation bump, semicircle, or loop.

At this point, the brain begins to play with adding loops upon loops that become circles upon loops in a playful movement that never ends. My brain can not conceive and direct this level of complexity but with play I am asking myself to allow a continuous flow of experiences.

This is extreme yet I found some responsiveness in both eyes. I hope to explore what is needed for both eyes, whether beginning the process many times help or if panic arises.

The image is not related to Anat Baniel Method but I will use the principles of attention, extremely slow movement, and variation.
Tim Hurst 11/09/17

Posted on

What’s Fatigue to a Dancer?

Today fatigue overcame me and I felt my body falling apart. I began to pull every image inside myself to ask if any of them could call me back to a semblance of malleability.

The first image I rely on is the double helix from bottom of spine through top of my head. Two opposite spirals are intertwined strands fashioned on DNA strands. These are image structures that rotate slowly through the entire length of the strands.

The double helix nourishes my awareness with motion and attention to all the moving systems in my cells. The rotation generates a level of energy that I can ask my body to receive as I release tension and resistance that reduces my malleability. My fear seems to grab on to the tension in hopes that some manner of control can stop a closing off of my ability to continue a nourishment process.

Time moves slowly and it seems forever before I sense of relief. I vary the shape of the double helix from one set of stands that is narrow enough to surround my spine to a broad set that travels the edges of my body. I image two sets of double helix along side my spine, crossing to enter my neck and exiting the front and back Fontanelles at the top of my head.

I image a horizontal double helix at the pelvic floor activating the lower vertebra and match the spiral movements at my cranial base activating the top vertebra. Then I follow these spirals with my eye movements.

The variations keep my attention moving and my awareness sharp for any differences in the movement of energy.

I go back to the full body double helix, this time from the arches of my feet up,through my legs, crossing through my hips, passing the the spine just above my pelvic bone, and passing up through my head. The slow rotation of the double helix is comforting and allows me time to ask and receive nourishing energy.

Once my energy begins to return I have to welcome it and feed excessive flow back into the double helix. Otherwise my mind and nerves activate in an overload mode. The slow steady double helix gives me the image to manage the change. Plus I have the presence of mind to ask for all my systems to receive these changes and to work together for the nourishment I need to come back from overwhelming fatigue.
Tim Hurst. 11/09/17