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My Inhale Walk

My walk today was in 95 degree noon day sun. I had to take a slower pace to savor the shade and not push too hard in the sun. Already needing a nap and needing to eat as well, I had to find ways to rejuvenate my energy.

My eyes were being shocked as I moved from shade to sun. I began rejuvenating my eyes in the shaded areas. Allowing my focus to wander through the flickering light of tree leaves calmed me and my eyes were being kind of rocked in the light cool breeze.

When I moved into the hot sunlight, my eyes would go into a rest state as if they were riding the cool breeze of the shade I can just left behind.

To rejuvenate myself, I slowed the pace of my body into an easy rise and fall along with my breathing. Then I realized that even with a slow overall body speed, my feet were speeding up to get to the next patch of shade.

I slowed my feet by catching the weight of my legs in a rise and then releasing their weight into a fall. Even the arches of my feet took this easy rise and fall pace. My breathing was heavy but deep and easy. I wonder if the air drafts under an airplanes wings were this kind of catching weight upwards and then weight lowering through air drafts when the craft slows.

A clear sensation began to form. Each cell of my body opened in anticipation of the next inhale. I felt like a ballon with trillions of air sacks to lift me as I walked in this slow rising and falling rhythm.

My study of dance came clear. Ballet lowering and rising is the experience of opening every cell for the next inhale. The visceral anticipation opens my curiosity to the next moment of fun and interconnection. The nutrients and oxygen on the way is a kind of reward for the hope I hold before me. All I can think of is to ask for the delight of my next breath.

Finding a deep shade on the sidewalk, I completely yield to a dance of following energy curves in multiple directions and shapes. I bank and dive into roller coaster curves with ever so slight and unnoticeable dances.
Tim Hurst 09/20/17

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Leg Lift Ease

I Experiment today with a way to practice lifting my legs with ease. Dana Lewis is working me back into Ballet with Pilates exercises. I want to loosen my hips and have fluid movement in my pelvis and legs.

Every morning I rest my pelvis on a 10 inch ball while moving my legs. Ann Arneau of The Pilates Studio in Austin demonstrated how I can use the weight of my legs to loosen the entire area. Without effort, I feel my weight rise and fall. The rise of course is a little trickier to feel the weight on the top side. I use an image of a spiral that rises above my leg and then falls below my leg so that the weight helps in both directions.

So I was doing this exercise this morning and I remembered Dana’s suggestion that while laying down I extend one leg under the other and lift gently with the bottom leg. Wow. The sensation was of ease! Combined with the image of weight rising and dropping, both legs engaged and the bottom leg was a gentle assist to go further in my hip flexors.

I did this with legs straight, bent, and in deep v or frog position. I ended with broad circles returning to legs parallel. Then it is back to Barre to integrate with Reverence and stillness at the end.
Tim Hurst 09/04/17

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Weight Buoyancy

Another image I have been studying is weight as buoyancy. The study came from many perspectives. Weight as effortless movement. Weight as rising and falling that reverse the placement of gravity on the upside or downside of a wave form. Simple muscle action becomes springing that takes place in an image before a movement.

This study changes every move I make because I have networked the experiences of weight into paired areas of my body and with different qualities of movement. Once the connections are made, they need only be nurtured with daily attention and experienced in a variety of dance situations.

The advantages are access to simple commands that activate any area of movement and personal experience. I can vary the sensation of power or vulnerability that ripples through any self instantly. I can vary the size and weight of the smallest or the largest movement. I can shift from completing a movement to adjusting and experimenting with different parts of the movement.
Tim Hurst 09/06/17