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Reversing Trauma

My study is of the point of venturing beyond known territory and receiving the courage to surrender previous connections. Prayer, meditation, and religious ritual have long been the entry points for this balance point. The tools for these practices since the earliest humans have been dance, rhythm, and singing. My study of these practices is my life’s work.

So many discoveries are being made about our neurological connections to our experience. Anat Baniel works with children and adults to retrain neurological connections. Her books, Kids Beyond Limits and Move Into Life are breakthroughs as are her therapeutic work with all ages.

Last night I saw two movies. One called Resurfacing was about the discoveries of combat veterans who stored their experiences as PTSD. This group used surfing to bring the veterans to confront the way they stored their experiences and get ways to begin there lives again. They used phrases like, “Learn to tell yourself a new story.” Meet that place of complete uncertainty. “I was totally engaged with the wave. Nothing else could get into my mind.”

They also dealt with the larger question of vulnerability that has been erased from their minds as soldiers. The ocean became a power greater than themselves. Their only hope was to respond to the power of the waves under them. Crashing and bailing off the surf board were a part of the learning. So was surrender to personal intuition and to the power beneath their feet and beneath the board they were standing on.

A second movie used martial arts and sword fighting in Korea as a metaphor for dealing with past traumas, ancestral and personal. The television series was Lucid Dreams. The process was the meditative experience of being able to go backwards in time to change an experience. Their use of music, artistic imagery, and martial arts gave me a visceral experience of this process.

With lifetimes of practice individuals supported by groups have achieved the ability to go inside a trauma or a guilt and reverse a downward spiral of self destruction and addiction. Today this critical balance point is being explored by the necessities of modern culture.

Experience of this balance point have been codified for example by meditation and martial art practices. What happens in building a code for a process like tottering on the unknown is identification of a specific goal like Nirvana or domination. Then we have to force ourselves to be true to the process. The examples are obvious, to meditate we have to remain still or maintain positions beyond our endurance level. With martial arts we have to hold the goal of meeting an adversary.

These systems have value in themselves yet they do not deal with the original search for access and entry into both an open macro view with no specified goal and a specific micro view to create and interchange connections.

My study is of the point of venturing beyond known territory and receiving the courage to surrender previous connections. Prayer, meditation, and religious ritual have long been the entry points for this balance point. The tools for these practices since the earliest humans have been dance, rhythm, and singing. My study of these practices is my life’s work.
Tim Hurst 09/06/17

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CranioSacral Therapy and Dance

CranioSacral Therapy, John Upledger
Notes:
Touch is a common thread of interaction with self and other.
Enter common personal space with another person and persons.
Neutral agenda: purpose to listen together
Gentleness and effortless attention support a neutral agenda for listening together.
Therapist enters neutral space by asking to experience unknown connections
Therapist studies in depth the interrelationships of physical structure, interactive movement of energy, fluid, and signals through the physical system, interrelationship of brain and tissue and intention.
Therapist observes and follows the interactive connections being made by persons present in therapy.

Osteopathy: send signals through tissue
CranioSacral Therapy: Signals sent also return with infinite amount of personal information

Fascial tissue connects the entire body
Dural fluid nourishes and protects brain and the neurological system
Send and receive signals through tissue and fluids

My experimentation is the practice of Craniosacral Therapy on myself and others to discover the sense of neutrality of agenda and how to listen to the workings of the human. Beyond that is the experience of asking and observing the multiple pathways within myself and a client and working with other practitioners. This is not my business so I have taken my time in this process.

Then I began to involve touch with my hands in my movement. Touch to get another sensation of movement internally and externally. Touch to follow a movement. Touch to catch myself at the bottom of a wave form. Touch to encourage a spiral or to initiate a slight loop that returns a movement to where it came from. Touch simply to provide a resting platform in the process of following a path.

Contrary to my inclination to direct my movement with touch, I practiced gentleness and listened for the information that was being carried in my movement signals. All this experimentation is very rewarding, opening new areas of curiosity all the time.

On one occasion several years ago, I performed this process while singing improvised songs which I often do when I will not wake my sweetheart in the early morning hours. The result was satisfying yet terrifying for me to perform and show such vulnerability.
Tim Hurst. 08/27/17

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Dancer’s Wisdom

The wisdom of Alexander Technique
Find the connection to one zone on the spine between the wings.
Let the connection lift you.
Think no more about rising and balancing.
Simply connect.

The dancer’s wisdom
Discover a connection of muscle of bone of body of move.
Place a discovery within a personal network all connected, already in tact.
Think no more about missing a skill, a lift, a leap.
Connect one part of the network to activate the whole.

The dancer’s wisdom shared by travelers in the many worlds of meditation and prayer.
Taste the delight of the coming movement within and without.
Enter the delight with full attention.
Exhale a thank you to ourselves, to those who share our journey, and to all of life that I do not yet know.
Tim Hurst. 05/20/17

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Dancer to Massage

Why do I go to a massage therapist?

A massage therapist asks the same questions as a dancer.
How can I free up the body to move freely?
How is an area of concern connected to other parts of the body?

Other questions I ask for myself.
How can I find ways for the body to work together better?
Can I follow the path of a pain or a weakness through my muscles to discover a support network?

What do I do after the session?
Stand for a moment.
Take a few steps.
Gather my thoughts and ask the therapist any questions that come to mind.

What do I do after I leave the session?
Stand or lay down to feel the connections made.
Take a short walk to test out what moves more freely and how to support the new changes.
Plan a series of movements or experiments to use daily.

How do I use the information from the session?
Test out sending energy or signals through the concerned areas.
Test out sending signals between the support areas I have identified.
Plan a series of movements or experiments to use daily.
Tim Hurst. 04/27/17