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Cymatics Rhythm Dance

I am very excited to discover Cymatics and the study of brain rhythms by Gilley at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Two areas jump out for me. One is multiple signal interconnections in the brain of the drummer and the other is the curved flows of energy between parts of the brain that establish networks of signals.

This is the clear language I am looking for in my study of signals networking the entire body in the study of dance.

Another exciting insight is the mathematical models that establish curves in the shape of the brain that verify a line through the center of the cranium, a cross-section of the brain.

This line is a mathematical model of what I refer to as the Centrum Cranial Diaphragm. I am interested in the ways dancers learn to pass signals through horizontal planes or diaphragms of the body and connect these diaphragms into signal networks.

These networks pass signals within and between diaphragms that build the interconnection of awareness and the creation and variation of patterned manifestations in movement, sound, and light.

My interest is in the fluid ability of musicians and dancers to create and continually reshape patterns in capsules that represent the complex nature of the human networks both individually and as groups. This is the work of the artist. I am delighted to see scientific research discover the importance of this process for activity in the brain and for the importance to understand learning and rehabilitation for all ages and types of humans.

With dancers, I believe that the areas of melody and rhythm are keys to all these studies. These studies of the brain rhythms are very exciting. Dance is important because all the complexity of the drummer’s motions and rhythms are being created within and outside the dancer. The dancer builds networks in each tiny area of the body and brain. These networks are called on to operate simultaneously in different directions with different intensities and coordinating all systems of sensation, emotion, intention, and continual support and repair.

In order to manage all this interconnected complexity, the dancer must also train the focus to shift between a micro and a macro view of all human systems. Understanding how the dancer does all this is my passion for looking into all realms of the experience of the dancer as well as the scientific and metaphysical study of those experiences.
Tim Hurst 08/25/17

Here are my notes from Cymatics and Brain Rhythms. My minimal understanding of science and math means I must catch the simplicity as I understand it in reference to my own study.

Cymatics
Oscillation of shape and sound
Water droplet levitations
2nd harmonic. Duple
3rd harmonic. Latin off beats
4th harmonic. Latin off beats in duple
5th harmonic. Equal emphasis all directions
6th harmonic. Equal shimmer in triple
7th harmonic. Shimmer in all directions
8th harmonic. Shimmer rhythm creates a circle

https://truth theory.com/2017/08/03/neuroscience-drumming-researchers-discover-secrets-drumming-humanbrain/

Rhythm and the Brain: Superorganism
Studies of the drummer’s brain.
Brain Rhythms: functional brain networks mediated by oscillating neural coupling
firing: synchronization: neural connectivity
Wave forms above and below a line: bottom up
Two areas of the brain establish a curved energy flow connecting below and then completing an ellipse connecting above.
Complete categorization of brain rhythms

My postulate of a Centrum Cranial Diaphragm
Line through the Cranium
Beginning at Brow between eyes: Top of soft palate: Temple area connecting Sphenoid internally and at Cranial Base: Pineal Gland: Hippocampus complex of brain: Completing at Occipital Sutures and Fourth Ventricle.

Sources used to support a Centrum Cranial Diaphragm
Cymatics identifying spirals as a basic shape in all nature from cells to universes and in all organisms: mathematical models that divide these spirals into ellipse and lines
Spiral in the Cranium: modeled as sets of triangles and One line passing through the center of the cranium edge to edge cross-section; through center of brain.
Tim Hurst 08/25/17

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Networked Movement

As I experiment with my feet finding a balancing place between all the extremities, I realize how my signals work. Neurobiologist believe that these micro movements in babies are random twitches.

My experience is that signals are always at work connecting, disconnecting, and reconnecting networks. That would mean that the many signals I feel in my feet are going in all directions at once doing their work to sort out relationships and functions like weight transfer and balance. These signals may be called random but that does not account for the purposeful relationship with the entire body as a network that includes the brain.

I studied Rewiring movement from Nina Martin, professor of dance at TCU in Texas. We were asked to lay on the floor and to allow signals to come from our spine that would slightly move different parts of our body.

The image Nina used was of a baby just before going to sleep. Often the baby will go through a series of twitches like an adult might do when ready to do something but being very frustrated. As I have mentioned neurobiologists study these flurries of signals as random movements essential to making connections in the brain.

Nina was not dealing with random movement but with the flurry of movements exploring all directions at once. When our brain kicked in to make the movements into patterns, Nina suggested we follow the pattern briefly and return to the exploratory flurry of signals initiating our movements.

My work with Nina Martin gave me ways to experience these signals to gain a perspective on the ways I move and how I can vary signals to affect my habitual and learned movements.

What this means to me is that the signals to and from my feet are always networking using exploratory movement. Patterned, learned, repetitive movement is another layer that can be adjusted with an awareness of how my signals work.

Deborah Hay innovated ways for dancers to disengaged from patterned movement so they can discover the layer of signals beneath. At this layer all systems can be engaged at once with movements that are directed and non-directed, physical and emotional, intentional and surrendered.

The method that Deborah used was the image of the individual cell having its own intelligence. As the dancer tunes to each cell a greater awareness develops of a complete network throughout the entire body. The necessity to plan and execute movement gives way to another kind of inner communication akin to meditation. Deborah can then give an image or a brief movement idea as a template for the cells to follow. The necessity has been transformed to listening to the cells rather than to our thoughts.

So with my feet I first become aware of the micro level of signals at work continually. Then I move into that micro level slowly enough to build awareness of the connections being made as networks. Then I can both follow and direct the networks individually and as full body networks.
Tim Hurst 08/23/17

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Dance as Network Model

Dance as a form of movement and training is a model, a template that networks the entire body.

The model has two basic operations. One is to switch focus from the micro view to the macro view of the entire person as a series of connected networks. Another is to manage the continuous networking of signals within the human system as both directed and surrendered through awareness of both processes.

To assist these operations dance uses two types of imagery. One is the categorization of signals that manage both the directed and the surrendered networks. Another is a master image that signals can pass through to network the entire body brain and to make detailed adjustments to specific micro areas.

To simplify the networks, dance offers an understanding of the sections of the body that can be networked together by signals passing through a master image. These body sections are called diaphragms or platforms. Each section has a purpose as a connector with its paired diaphragm and as a part of the entire body brain network.

It is my belief that dance is the repository of all this information due to the evolutionary growth of the human. Dance as a networking form grew from the earliest humans, from their imitation and communication with other life forms and from their insistence on communication within the unknowns of spiritual experience. I would conjecture that this is the reason dance has been able to contribute to and absorb the discoveries of every movement form including athleticism, martial arts, and religious ritual. I also believe this is the basis for the power of dance along with music to symbolize the experience of entire cultures and entire epochs of human history.

This is also the reason why dance as a form is offering so many innovations in the understanding and managing of disease and rehabilitation.
Tim Hurst 08/24/17