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Fractal is Dance

Fractal geometry is characterized by self similarity and endless iteration. Using dance, the human experiences the fractal as a simple form that varies by repeating an infinite range of combinations. Using this experimental process, dance interrelates all the human systems and has the outcome of simplifying the entire experience in a melodic form of metaphor.

Dance is a friendly entry point for using the fractal. Actually dance is already built on the fractal with its full experience in every direction, every mood, every dynamic, every rhythm.

Dance is defined as the principles that were selected through evolution and hard wired along with music into the earliest humans. Dance movement is similar to music which uses only twelve notes and is infinitely able to express in melodic statements the unity of a person, a generation, a people.

The artistic process like the scientific process is built on simple elements that are combined into an infinite number of experiments. Dance deserves our focus because it uniquely interconnects every human system physical, personal, motivational. Dance goes beyond mechanics to the quality of movement and to the interrelationship of emotion and the building of the self.

Fractal concepts are applied in dance by the use of pattern, interconnecting signals throughout the entire person through perception, rhythm, timber, and melody.

Pattern are added to pattern down to the smallest size and to the slowest speed. Basic shapes are triangles and spirals.

Signals are differentiated through the nervous and limbic systems. Signals initiated from specific areas of the spine define movement qualities and dynamics of mood and emotion.

Quality is defined as variations of initiation and extension giving concepts such as sustained or staccato, flicking and floating.

Dynamics is a use of increase and decrease, emphasis to initiate force or ease.

Anticipation precedes initiation with either arc or continuing line. The variations interrelate the processes of perception, integration of new forms as they emerge, and the process of metaphor to simplify and express the building of the self and the community.

Rhythms are constructed of sound and silence. Rhythms are visualized with shape using a binary mode made of short and long durations.

Timber is identified with imagery of sensation, color and taste.

Melody is the formation of a metaphor to represent a person, a people.

Perception differentiates incoming signals and builds awareness and interconnection of each human system. Perception may begin with the eyes, ears, nose, taste, skin, then progress to the sense of chemical and electrical modulations within the body, then may become interrelated to the processes of anticipating and initiating transformations and finally to the building of the self through metaphor. Perception may be within a range of both familiar or unfamiliar experience. All experiences are integrated through fractal processes of identifying simple forms, varying these forms in infinite repetition of combinations.
Tim Hurst 09/06/15

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What’s Movement to a Dancer?

What appears to be physical changes of position and poses is for the dancer a refining of complex networks of signals connecting, dissolving, and reconnecting throughout all the systems of the person.

These signals travel in curved pathways that have been understood by dancers for centuries and are now studied as Structural Integration. It is the curved pathways of signals that a dancer experiences as continuous movement of sensation, anticipation, initiation, completion, and transition into multiple directions at once.

The dancer’s tools of compression and extension are related to signals that are continuously in motion. What appears as stillness or a pause is actually another state of movement.

An audience can immediately identify the delight of a dancer’s simple movement. For the dancer also the movement is an instantaneous connection of physical, emotional, and intentional signals.

From the viewer’s point of view, the movement looks automatic as if a body memory has taken over. For the dancer, there is a rapid shifting of many kinds of focus. One type of focus is from the micro view to monitor a specific skill and the macro view of the entire person at once. Another type of focus is in the awareness which shifts the view from foreground to background.

Even though it may seem as if some movements are directed and others automatic, for the dancer patterns are variations of experience that work at levels sometimes called heightened awareness and sometimes requiring less attention. Both levels of the patterned skill are interconnecting with each other, the difference is the focus on foreground or background.

The dancer’s view is more of a malleable system that is in continual responsiveness. Automatic movement and muscle memory do not adequately explain their complex process.

For the viewer and often for the choreographer, the pattern is seen as a repetition, a replica of a specific movement. For the dancer, the pattern is also a malleable experience that is varied by the thoughts, emotions, and energy of the moment. This is one of the reasons that no two dance performances are the same.

Another astonishing perspective is the dancer’s ability to alter the experience of any movement with a set of modulators. A physical analogy is a musicians sound board. Any sound can be modulated and blended with dials that give more or less of different qualities.

The dancer modulates not just speed or duration but also the qualities that bring emphasis, heaviness or lightness, subtlety or boldness, to name only a few. Like the musician the outcome is a confluence of emotion and interpretation of melodies, rhythms, and harmonies.

Imagery is a tool to assist the dancer with the complexity of shifts in focus and with interconnecting the centers of movement, emotion, and formation of meaning. Signals are shaped and managed with imagery.

Also the anatomy of the body is managed with imagery. Physically, the dancer is also working with the body as a malleable system. To do this the dancer has developed imagery within a training processes for understanding the body movement.

Imagery is often indicating the direction of energy flows. Using the image of signals different areas of the body can be viewed as signal initiators and receptors. Rather than commanding a body part to move, the signal begins at a location and travels back and forth to other sites in the body. These specific locations are interconnected into networks.

Signals move between different areas of the body are called diaphragms and platforms. They usually cross the entire body and give the perspective of the dancer as moving three dimensionally and in every direction. Each one is a major sending and receiving point for many nerve endings and flows of energy.

The platforms are the arches and surfaces of the feet, the palms of the hands, the collar bone and scapula that suspend the shoulder girdle, the base of the skull, and the Fontanelles or meetings of the cranial bones at the top of the head.

The dancer makes detailed studies of each platform to refine the nerve and energy flows to and from each area. Then they connect their access to each by establishing networks between them.

The diaphragms are muscular and give clues to the dancer’s detailed training of large and small muscle groups. The diaphragms are the pelvic diaphragm also known as the pelvic floor, the lower rib cage diaphragm also known as the respiratory diaphragm, the mid chest diaphragm also known as the dancer’s diaphragm, and the Centrum Brain diaphragm with one known moving part the soft palate.

The diaphragms are the dancer’s keys to lifting up from feet to head, to spreading the body horizontally to engage front and back muscles, to arching and rotating the spine, to connecting the torso and the spine to movement of the legs and articulation of the knees, ankles, arches, and toes of the feet.

What difference does the dancer’s perspective make? Movement is a springing motion rather than a pounding one. A balance of extension and compression takes less effort and training goes past the desire to try too hard. The shifts of focus bring a sense of delight to movement. Every area of the body is accessible and trained as a supportive network.
Tim Hurst 10/09/17

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Human or Transformer

When my grandson was a child I told him that when he became a man he would walk like a Transformer. As it turned out he has taken a liking to both Pilates that takes a malleable approach to movement and Weight Training that emphasizes the compression of building blocks in the body.

My interest is the way that the dancer weaves together the two worlds. The exercise and body therapy world has become fascinated with Structural Integration which I have experienced through the principles of dance and through the study of Craniosacral Therapy.

The premise is that the entire body is a network of interconnected fascia or soft tissue and this fascia acts as one elastic system that pulls the bones and organs into an efficient moving whole. This explains what the dancer and many body therapists know, that pain in one area of the body may be related to other areas of the body. See anatomytrains.com.

What fascinates me about Structural Integration is the dancer’s experience of balance and weight. Movement for the dancer is the springing of the entire body, an experience of fascia as a full body elasticity that requires a minimum of effort. The lines of fascia from head to toe are the study of the dancer who has developed an intricate understanding of the spiraling connections of muscles, tendons, and ligaments throughout the body.

The dancer’s study is to clarify the signals that travel through the fascial network. With dance, the movement of the body is a delicate interplay of both directing those signals and understanding the way signals move. The dance training process is the interplay of sending signals and integrating the signals into networks that increase awareness. A networked movement can then be called on as a way to increase awareness.

The dancer’s approach to balance is telling in this process. As the concepts of Structural Integration explain there is a continuous compression and expansion of the fascia to organize the movement of the bones.

The dancer brings this process to awareness. Each movement is not a forced compression of muscles to get to balance. Instead balance is millions of movements sensing the placement of bones and the continual adjustments of fascia within the entire body. All movement is thus connected no matter how subtle or how bold.

Dance is uniquely placed to understand this process involving also the integration of intention, anticipation, and emotion. This understanding of the way movement is directed and nurtured brought the dancer to the use of the image

The image gives a way to translate the orders and desires of the person into movement. To do this requires an understanding of the way our networks receive and integrate data from each part of the person.

Basic to communication is the ability to receive data in the way it is sent. A parallel is the way different personalities communicate, by attention and empathy. Forced and directed communication must operate in the context of the entire person. This process is what the dancer has grown into an art form using a combination of feeling and visualization in images.
Second is the understanding of patterns of movement. The dancer has trained movement patterns to integrate into the entire body. These patterns network the body’s fascia and also the communication networks of attention and empathy.

This process is not a static set of movements but rather networked movements that are continually adjusting to a refreshed human system of emotions, awareness, and empathy. This is the process of nature that begins with simple movement and adds one variation at a time so the system integrates a pattern that is both a renewing of what is known and a surprise of a new creation.

Each movement is an interaction of compression and expansion continually adjusting as well as the human self receiving and reforming the experience of known patterns and creations of continually expanding creations.

The monitor of all these processes is the human self. We have mistakenly looked to the abstract brain as what needs to be trained. The dancer has developed the perspective of training our experience that includes the physical body and also all the other aspects of the person.
Tim Hurst 10/06/17

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Cymatics Rhythm Dance

I am very excited to discover Cymatics and the study of brain rhythms by Gilley at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Two areas jump out for me. One is multiple signal interconnections in the brain of the drummer and the other is the curved flows of energy between parts of the brain that establish networks of signals.

This is the clear language I am looking for in my study of signals networking the entire body in the study of dance.

Another exciting insight is the mathematical models that establish curves in the shape of the brain that verify a line through the center of the cranium, a cross-section of the brain.

This line is a mathematical model of what I refer to as the Centrum Cranial Diaphragm. I am interested in the ways dancers learn to pass signals through horizontal planes or diaphragms of the body and connect these diaphragms into signal networks.

These networks pass signals within and between diaphragms that build the interconnection of awareness and the creation and variation of patterned manifestations in movement, sound, and light.

My interest is in the fluid ability of musicians and dancers to create and continually reshape patterns in capsules that represent the complex nature of the human networks both individually and as groups. This is the work of the artist. I am delighted to see scientific research discover the importance of this process for activity in the brain and for the importance to understand learning and rehabilitation for all ages and types of humans.

With dancers, I believe that the areas of melody and rhythm are keys to all these studies. These studies of the brain rhythms are very exciting. Dance is important because all the complexity of the drummer’s motions and rhythms are being created within and outside the dancer. The dancer builds networks in each tiny area of the body and brain. These networks are called on to operate simultaneously in different directions with different intensities and coordinating all systems of sensation, emotion, intention, and continual support and repair.

In order to manage all this interconnected complexity, the dancer must also train the focus to shift between a micro and a macro view of all human systems. Understanding how the dancer does all this is my passion for looking into all realms of the experience of the dancer as well as the scientific and metaphysical study of those experiences.
Tim Hurst 08/25/17

Here are my notes from Cymatics and Brain Rhythms. My minimal understanding of science and math means I must catch the simplicity as I understand it in reference to my own study.

Cymatics
Oscillation of shape and sound
Water droplet levitations
2nd harmonic. Duple
3rd harmonic. Latin off beats
4th harmonic. Latin off beats in duple
5th harmonic. Equal emphasis all directions
6th harmonic. Equal shimmer in triple
7th harmonic. Shimmer in all directions
8th harmonic. Shimmer rhythm creates a circle

https://truth theory.com/2017/08/03/neuroscience-drumming-researchers-discover-secrets-drumming-humanbrain/

Rhythm and the Brain: Superorganism
Studies of the drummer’s brain.
Brain Rhythms: functional brain networks mediated by oscillating neural coupling
firing: synchronization: neural connectivity
Wave forms above and below a line: bottom up
Two areas of the brain establish a curved energy flow connecting below and then completing an ellipse connecting above.
Complete categorization of brain rhythms

My postulate of a Centrum Cranial Diaphragm
Line through the Cranium
Beginning at Brow between eyes: Top of soft palate: Temple area connecting Sphenoid internally and at Cranial Base: Pineal Gland: Hippocampus complex of brain: Completing at Occipital Sutures and Fourth Ventricle.

Sources used to support a Centrum Cranial Diaphragm
Cymatics identifying spirals as a basic shape in all nature from cells to universes and in all organisms: mathematical models that divide these spirals into ellipse and lines
Spiral in the Cranium: modeled as sets of triangles and One line passing through the center of the cranium edge to edge cross-section; through center of brain.
Tim Hurst 08/25/17