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Nurturing Back Strains

Today I nurture my Quadratus Lomborum (QL), the little square of muscle connecting my pelvis bone the iliac to my spine and to my lower ribs. I have again strained these very tense and unforgiving support muscles. At its worse, I could not straighten my torso and had trouble rising from a sitting position.

Lifting from my pelvis and sending signals to lift under my rib cage has given me freedom to undulate my spine and to swivel around it in all directions.

Counter rotations of paired arms and hips with head added a freedom to slow my visual focus and to internally follow my full body experience.

Then I add an image of a double helix that passes signals from pelvic diaphragm through my QL, through my center spine diaphragm at the lower rib, through my suspended diaphragm between my shoulder blades crossing under my arms, through my neck and cranial base and out the top of my head.

The image of a double helix is two spiraling strands crossing and recrossing from my lower spine through the top of my head. The purpose of the double helix is to organize the signals connecting my entire body. This image allows an instant broad view of the intricate connections of each system of muscle and bone and intention and emotion.

In other words, I can simply visualize the double helix through my body and allow the integration of signals through every system. I can vary size of the double helix to surround only my spine or expand it to encompass the outer circumference of my body.

Today as I purposefully nurture my QL I allow gentle signals to pass through and keep my entire body supple and responsive to initiation of movement that includes signals of many qualities.

I feel lightness and a bright curiosity with each signal passing through my lower and upper torso. I can lift in one area and support the other in a curve forward, back, and diagonal. My QL goes along for the ride without seizing up or complaining with pain.

The counter rotations seem to ease my mind and foster a flow of focus through my entire body.
Tim Hurst 10/17/17

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Whole Body Networking

Today I experiment with a macro view of the entire body moving at once.

Since signals of all kinds move through our bodies all the time, my question is how do dancers network the entire body as one unit with many divergent purposes and directions.

I take my exercise with hips on top of a small ball to loosen my hips. The goal is to lift and lower my legs feeling the heaviness of their weight and using a minimum amount of force. I feel a degree more freedom of movement in my hip joints in this exercise.

I have already discussed my discovery of the dancer’s use of weight as floating up as well as falling down. This image along with my own of the double helix seems to require little effort and increases my freedom of movement.

While moving my legs, I want to unify signals traveling through my entire body. Many variations happen within one dance class connecting movement of the legs and arms, the erect spine, and the head and neck.

First I make specific variations on my leg movements with bent and extended knee. I lower and raise my legs with whole leg and with specific parts such as ankle, arch, heel as I lower and raise my legs. I circle my legs in these different postures.

Then I add my arms extending as a semi-circle out from my body. With each movement of my legs I coordinate the arms out and in. This regulates my breath into an effortless inhale and exhale.

Dance continually trains the two way movement of energy through the spine and out the top of the head. My movements have a new lightness and ease as I send pulses of energy from different areas of the spine upwards and down through my feet. This engagement of the whole body is a different experience from moving only the legs. I feel more liveliness and more anticipation before each movement.

Adding variations of head and neck movement with each expansion of legs and arms became yet another experience. I especially liked my reminder to connect the top vertebra of the spine with a slight bobbing motion of the head. Doing this I relaxed my neck muscles around my spine and even my jaw before tilting or swiveling my head.

All this networking is essential to me with my tendency to clamp down my movements with extra tension. Establishing these networks of connections help me to move more freely and with less effort.
Tim Hurst 10/04/17

Pulsing my outer hip muscles engages the pelvic diaphragm

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Tuning the Helix

Today my body is bursting to reconnect. Imbalances pop up everywhere, Hips twist. Right leg needs to lengthen. T6 between the shoulder blades is out somehow. All these complaints sends signals of pain to my right knee.

First I acknowledge each area of need to just say help is on the way. Slow and small movement is best like a very detailed barre or a Tai Chi and Chi Gong movement.

For slow focused movements, I send a shower of many signals from all directions. Then I direct the shower from the spine. I shift the signals first to the scattered shower then to the directed shower. This brings the area to life and ready to reconnect.

Today I introduce some slow counter rotations of head with hips in one direction and shoulder girdle and solar plexis to the opposite direction. All this is very subtle movement in slow motion. I can enlarge one area at a time, a hip rotating forward or back in a semi circle. The back under the shoulders can swivel in the same or the opposite direction of the hips.

All of this is to bring life to each area and to clarify the signals that can be shifted through body brain connections.

Then I am ready to apply imagery to reconnect my signal networks. The difference between the imagery of a DNA shaped helix and spiraled signals is coming a little clearer.

The helix image is a structure that I can place within different areas of my body. First I place a helix spiraling from both feet up through my spine and out my head. I experience the slight spiraling of the entire helix image structure. The image can spiral in either direction, can ripple with areas that are trying to align, and become larger or smaller in areas that need more detailed focus.

A single signal can travel instantly through the entire helix and return. For example a contraction in the arch of the feet can send a clear signal out the top of the head. This is my first signal just to test where the disconnects are.

The signal follows the spiraled pathway of the helix and can reshape the position and size of the helix to fit its trajectory. To deal with the imbalance in my legs, I alter the helix to be a loop from one foot through the pelvic diaphragm to the other foot. I am then balanced on a series of spiraling springs, the helix, that can simultaneously apply equal pressure or apply a lifting pressure to one leg while moving the opposite leg.

The same applies to the area between the shoulder blades. I apply one helix from finger tips of one hand through my body to finger tips of the other hand. This helix image engages the area under my arms, connects with the T6 area of the spine and engages the solar plexis at the front of my body.

I move each area in all directions by sending clear signals through the helix image. Because I am imaging the helix as a moveable structure, I do not need to construct the signal as a spiral. The signal travels instantly through the helix. The spiral of the signal through the helix can reflect in my movement if I wish.
The next stage is reconnecting the support areas of the horizontal diaphragms. I have already connected the arches of the feet to the entire body. I continue the connections through my body with the Barre, Floor-BarreTM and variations of Modern Dance sequences.

Reconnecting the pelvic diaphragm is placing a horizontal helix within the pelvis and hip areas. I can send lifting signals through the helix and also signals for expanding and contracting that activate the lower spine and legs.

From the pelvic diaphragm I can enlarge the helix and send signals crossing the spine to activate which vertebra that need my attention.

I can repeat the counter rotations that I used to test my problem areas earlier.

Each diaphragm is important. The one that is calling for help this morning is the Cranial Base where the top vertebra Atlas can swivel and bob the head in all directions. I can send signals from the arches of the feet or from the pelvic diaphragm.

A signal can ripple through the helix to bob or rotate the head in any direction. The ease of motion is so much simpler than the command, “Now move the head.” The movement is connected into a full body network and the sensation is of movement growing from inside out.

So I have spent most of my time notating these steps today. Now I need to spend some focused time with my moving self.
Tim Hurst 09/10/17