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Do Dancers Preserve Powers We Ignore?

With the discussion of marijuana and opioids, the issue of a full range of medications comes into view. We seem to direct our goals to replacing chemicals we already generate within our selves. Or if necessary we block the receptors or replace the balance of the body with our own designed balance.

All these approaches are generally a one way approach of what our thought can conjure as computer data to design a model of life.

The problem is that we have no idea what life is as a separate physical, chemical, or mathematical reality. We are thinking, feeling, emoting, self and group directed people trying to concoct a model for life. Our thought has led us to much destruction and to high rates of depression, suicide, and almost a love affair with addiction.

There is however a subset of people that are preserving the brain as we know it. They are dancers, musicians, and people of prayer who are deemed different or creative and thus easily discounted from a data point of view.

Meanwhile, the dancer has an intimate relationship with endorphins, dopamine, the connecting and reconnecting of synapse, the monitoring, and healing of injury, not the least is the override of trauma that provides personal perspective upon ones life.

Obviously creative and religious people get lost in our cultural searches that end up in discouragement and addiction. This is a common trait of us all.

What these endeavors hold is a common process of life and learning developed over thousands of years. They deserve another look to get a glimpse of the brain and the networks at work that are disappearing without our notice.
Tim Hurst 07/24/18

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This I Live

I live only because of the opportunity to move in two directions at once.

I do this with a trajectory of curving that does not collide but rather rises and suspends and subsides.

I do this with a willingness to meet all intersections with delight in every crossing and every parallel movement as the actions of following and leading emerge.

I live within the dialogue of my trajectories and and my intersections. This dialogue becomes my experience that I embrace for better and for worse.

The pathways and the meetings require more courage and more insight than I have at any one moment. I have to rely on an inquisitive delight that is a gift and a part of me that knows how to grow.

The courage I ask for is to trust this gift inside me that relates me to all other life. When I accept the courage and the gift then I join with other life to grow. When I refuse this courage which is my default choice I shrivel and turn away from growth and away from life.

The dialogue between trajectory of curving and intersections of movement reveals more about myself that I can conceive.

I am trapped in my isolated experience that refuses to move between the two arenas.
Real and unreal
Self and other selves
Love and hate
Clarity and confusion
Decisive and distracted
True and false

Micro and macro
Skills and personality
Physical and spiritual
Mechanical and melodic
Forced and natural
Bold and subtle

Directed and surrendered
Dominant and sujagated
Deceiver and Deceived
Seeker and sought
Controlled and uncontrolled
Conscious and unconscious
Health and Disease
Strong and Weak
Agile and stiff
Hurt and healed
Taumatized and peaceful
Delight and despair

My only truth is that I am built to move between the two directions. Each has its own pathway and each has its own intersections.

To the degree that i take delight in navigating with a curved trajectory and a willingness to engage all myself within the intersections offered to me, my experience becomes my own as a part of a greater whole. I accept the gift that means growth and that guides me through all circumstances.
Tim Hurst 07/23/18

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Dancer Dragon Slayer Prep

I join Dancer Dragon Slayer.
We choose a tree where we will prepare for our journey.

We close our eyes, We enter secret spaces, expansive kingdoms.
Here I will know the fullness of courage that will carry me
to the Dragon’s lair.

The moment my eyes close, my dance begins with movements so slight, I feel my eyes joining the tree quietly rustling with delicate breezes and also creating our own breezes simply with our hidden eyes.

I recall thousands of moments just before entering a dance. Silent. Absolutely still. Readiness becomes brightness.

My eyes relax and move calmly spreading to receive the life around me preparing to send waves of life that my eyes will precede and then follow.

My breath gives way to spreading and lifting brightness through me. My arms too give way to a weight as if they are falling into gravity in all directions at once.

We enter our secret kingdoms the two of us, Dancer Dragon Slayer and I.
Tim Hurst 07/09/18

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My Urgency towards a Dynamic Vision of Dance

What is my urgency of exploring a Dynamic Vision of Dance?

Every day I wake up to hear of a new discovery about human intelligence, how the brain can be improved to take advantage of this emotional or athletic intelligence, and what substance in what kind of pill will instantly enhance my abilities.

The question that interests me is when has this kind of exponential growth happened before in our history? It may have happened many times after we as a species had lulls of discouragement and disillusionment.

Most probably a leap in human skills of this sort happened as the human began to accept their new powers of the brain. Most important though are the gifts the human developed before realizing the new powers. These gifts became strengths that made it possible to garner the courage and the commitment to explore and build on these new powers.

We seem to be in one of those discouraged seasons of history. Even with all our new discoveries, we look at our youth and find more anxiety, more suicides, more depression and more addiction to substances that we rely on to face our challenges.

One perspective that sticks out as something that has helped humans to persevere is a discovery by Steve Johnson. In his book Wonderland, How Play has Change the Course of History. He connects play to the experience of Delight.

The first question Johnson asks is why in the evolution of humans, the flute preceded the invention of fire. The sounds of the flute were intricately developed to produce a scale that is mathematically astounding. The answer he gives is that our ancestors explored the experience of Delight.

What gift did humans have to help deal with a larger brain? Delight. Where did the intricacies of math and astronomical observation come from? Delight

How did humans persevere in the discouraging times when changes were demanded and new powers seemed unwieldy? Delight was studied and practiced in three ways. Two of the activities were named in language as the same thing. Music and Dance were the same activity. Music and Dance and Religion held the same purpose. First it was Delight. From the delight came bonding of the group plus the growth of observation and anticipation. Most important was the growth all three brought to make phrases that captured the sense of the individual and the group. A phrase was a declaration of the hope and aspiration of each group in their search for the courage to persevere.

What is interesting in our times is our reliance on music and dance as ways to grow our Delight while at the same time not understanding their importance. They are relegated to the realm of religion that is not understood but exploited for the hope it gives.

What is my part in this urgent quest for an overall vision?

I have a unique history with music dance, and religion. All took me a long time to grasp. The technique was slow coming. My brain would freeze if I got over stimulated with each study.

My only entry point in to music, dance, or religion was Delight. Because of early trauma, I developed an escape hatch that was a kind of surrender to Delight. I discovered a particular kind of surrender that always brought Delight. Plus i was able to play and sing music with an abandon that I did not understand.

The tenants of religion were puzzling to me yet I felt myself abandon to Delight in meditative and ritual experiences.

An example of the difference is that learning music or dance has been a process of being a stick man with jerky movements and continual mistakes. Likewise, memory was not something I understood.

What I was able to do was to abandon myself to Delight by playing with the pieces of learning I could remember from a class. I could commit my pieces to memory by connecting each section to a specific kind of Delight.

I would often have lapses of memory while performing. There was no recorded memory of the music or the dance. I would improvise until the Delight would return and there was the remainder of the phrase, the tonality, or the melody.

So my study of Delight has a special meaning to me. Also I seek to understand the kind of surrender that brought me to enter Delight.

All these things are what dancers, musicians, and people of religion approach in their own ways. I have a very detailed perspective because it has all come to me through a longer time line than most.

For example, it took me six summers of daily swimming to learn how to coordinate legs and arms and breath in swimming. Tennis took about the same time just to hit a ball after I bounced it in front of me.

I will not admit the enormous length of time I have spent to arrive at an ease with music and dance. Religion took years of intense meditative practices to coordinate my readiness to my willingness. I persevered in order to both surrender and to reach for the courage to ask the real questions.
Tim Hurst 07/02/18