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Dancer Cares for Energy

I Dance every cell of me
Every cell of me has its own group
Every cell group follows a pathway through me

Every pathway has a purpose within me
Every purpose follows my journey to form and reform all of me

My cell groups are simple
Some gather Energy
Some store Energy
Some launch and dock Energy
Some track and respond to disruption of Energy
Some honor and absorb Energy

I Dance to care for Energy.
Care shapes and reshapes my pathways for Energy
Care is a full spectrum of curiosity
from smallest to largest and shortest to longest
Care embraces all cell groups as a part of my journey
Care invites all cell groups to become one Image
Care grows one Image into many families of Images
I Dance to care for Energy.

Grasping the concept of caring for Energy within Cell groups can be seen visibly as waves in the sea.

Waves spread across an expanse and gather Energy
Waves gather Energy as they lower and as they rise
Waves shape Energy as ripples, as choppy peaks, as lapping and curling masses
Waves roar and whimper as they meet other Energy from the air and the earth.

I Dance as a wave of the sea
I spread Energy across the expanse of me
I gather Energy as I lower and as I rise
I shape Energy inside me and around me
I merge with other waves as we shape our journeys
I roar and I whimper as I meet all other Energy of air and person and earth.

I Dance to Care for
Energy within me,
Energy from me
Energy I meet
Energy I merge
Energy I absorb.

I Dance to Care for
the shaping of me
the joining of me
the growing of me in all my meetings.
Tim Hurst 01/28/19 6:44 am

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My Dance My Moves

Every year Ginger and I dance at a party for a Dance Retailers gathering. And every year I get the same comments. “I love all your moves.” “You have got the moves.” “I love watching you and Ginger dance because you make it all look so easy.”

What are all these people seeing? It is not expertise because we are improvising and mixing every possible sequence we have ever experienced from many forms of dance. And it is not perfection of any style that would be called good.

My favorite response to our dancing is when we are the first couple on the dance floor. Finally we have the courage to do that…sometimes. Another couple look at each other and one spouse says, “We can do that.” There are immediately three couples on the floor.

So what are they seeing in us? First we are just ourselves and we are letting that be seen. Second, we have spent lots of time learning to love every movement we make. Being satisfied no matter how subtle or bold goes a long way to growing our movement. Third, we have learned not to force as we extend ourselves and how to reveal our soft side in the transitions. And fourth, we know dance as moving in a full circle from center outwards and in every direction. In other words, every movement is a discovery of a fresh new angle or quality that we may never have experienced before.

All of our perspective adds up to be forming and re-forming all of our movements and emotions and hopes with every dance sequence. The Energy we share is our awareness. The including of other people is the same awareness.
Tim Hurst 01/23/19

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My Dance Learning

I have limited my dancing in public because I needed to learn to love every move as something I own. I needed to delight in every exploration and every surprise as a gift without thinking about what it looked like to other people. I also wanted to dance with Ginger as a gentle interchange of energy that could delight us both.

I am the perfect person to take this on because my body seemed to need constant direction and lots of force to complete any sequence of movements. Learning was not me encouraging myself but me forcing myself to move.

Add to this that I had very little pattern memory and had to basically relearn a movement each time I did it. I luckily discovered what Ballet and Modern teachers call “sending Energy” and every movement became a series of sensations that I could follow as long as the Image stayed with me. When the Image would fade away, I had to improvise long enough for the Image to return.

So I took on the challenge of finding a way to love every movement I made and a way to remember sequences.
Tim Hurst 01/23/19

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Suspension Dances

Dance instantly invites so many moments of entry into suspension.

Suspension is like a precipise between effort and ease, between a task and a day dream.

Entering the dance of suspension, I experience the dance imagery of floating and circular space around me. Even my feet know suspension. With each step the under arch and the top instep find mid-air a delightful place to find themselves.

Dancers exercise their bodies and their imagery to free the legs from the torso. A key image is energy that moves up the torso through every cell and every muscle group. Then the entire body becomes a network to enter suspension.

I experience suspension as a wave that extends energy to the top and then gathers energy on the curve over and downwards. Taking that image into every part of my body, suspension is movement at its richest point.

The image in music is the sound transitions between a suspenseful chord and a clear resolution or a preparatory moment just before a repetition of a melody.

This moment of anticipation is called a “creative pause” in the dances of Barbara Mettler, an early innovator in Modern Dance. The Ballet teacher calls out “And one, And two.” The “And” suspends this moment just before the down beat and just before initiating a movement phrase. Street Dance has a bright spark, maybe even a slight smile just before the smallest or the the grandest flight into the air.

And it is these entry moments that bring me the most delight. In fact, the moment I enter a dance, I smile knowing that the delight will meet me with more connections than I can grasp and more satisfaction than I could ever expect.

Dance Tools I aspire to understand: the sensation of riding the suspension in time, in space, in thought, and in emotion while accepting all the delight I can handle.
Tim Hurst 06/23/18

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Expanding My Space Dance

What is my dance today? Expanding Space

I live within an image of my spine as a whole unit from inside my cranium to the bottom of my sacrum.

Expanding space my image surrounds the fluid sheaths around my spine and surrounding my brain.

From these vulnerable territories my movement emerges as gentle, microscopic, and undulating as gentle waves on a shore.

Spreading sensations from surrounding areas emerge meeting the outside air at the edges of my body.

My torso rotates around my spine through the sensations of inner space. My arms and legs follow the pathways of my spine raising and lowering, waving and suspending.

My head bobs into outer space carrying my entire body into spirals in every direction.

The energy filling me moves beyond my body approaching trees and people who emanate their own unfamiliar energies. Returning to my spine I craft waves of movement to offer a meeting of energies.

Dance Tools I Seek
Continuous spiraling energy distinguishing itself as internal and external.
Tim Hurst 06/22/18

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My Expanding Dance

What dance am I today? Expansion

Expansion becomes spreading becomes extension becomes movement.

From top of my spine, my sensation awakens lower brain, throat, jaw.
Spreading through center brain to meditative silence, palate, back of eyes.
Extending in rolling curves to memory of delight and the roaring of energy through the top of my head.

Each section of spine extends to awaken a vulnerable collar bone, an expanding chest, a spreading back, the widening of diaphragms respiratory and pelvic.

Networked energies culminate in the spine’s extension into exploratory extensions as arms, as legs. as head.

Tools of Dance I Seek.
Fluid shifting of focus from single points to connected energy centers.
Tim Hurst 06/22/18

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Dance Basic Ease

Today i need to quiet myself from being busy and worrying. I follow my process of slow circular movement crossing the midline of my body. I do not need the busy activity of the spin but instead gently move arms, palms facing, back and forth across my spine.

My head is networked to balance on my spine with a slight bobble as my eyes and head move the opposite direction of my hands. My hands face each other, arms easily outstretch away from my body. Signals from my spine lift my elbows and soften my hands as they travel in spiral movements up each vertebra of my spine.

My experience is connection of my entire self, a sensation of ease.

It is this study of ease that make up my experiments to find a balance of directed and collaborative movement. The networking in today’s movement comes from Tai Chi but I understand the principles from the detailed training of Ballet and Modern Dance.

I keep trying to verbalize the simplicity of the Ballet learning process. I try to trace the principles in action.

The basis is that energy must be allowed to move through me. A dance image allows my arms to float up. My arms lift from energy traveling from my spine, under my shoulders and around my arms. The action is more than muscles moving from mental direction or from intentional force. .

The pathway of the energy is a spiral traveling through my arms and beyond each finger. The palms facing activate the connection of energy between each hand.

Basically an energy field is created between my arms and energy connections of my torso that begin and end at my spine.

The training of energy movement is the focus. Anatomy is adjusted to encourage the easy flow of energy. Arms are softened by the spiral of energy passing through. Elbow, wrist, and finger joints are flexible from energy passing through their gently curved positions.

The result of this focus is an approach to anatomy as alignment to foster easy flow of energy. Maintaining an erect spine is no longer the commands to hold myself up and pull my shoulders back. Each vertebra is balancing within a flow of energy that is traveling through and spiraling around my spine.

This detailed understanding of movement is why Ballet and Modern Dance have been at the forefront of innovation in training for both flexibility and strength. The effects are a deeper understanding of injury prevention and movement rehabilitation.

One goal is an ease of movement in any direction responsive to any variation of speed, intensity, and quality such as lightness or heaviness. Another goal is the networking of energy signals that create a continual energy loop through the horizontal plane of the arms and the vertical one of the spine. The image of energy loops are applied to every area of the body to respond as a supportive network.

The image of spiral energy is one key to dance as a way to generate delight by engaging the entire person.

I experience the image of spiral energy as a way to generate new connections, a way to go beyond my limitations, and a way to respond to strains to avoid injury.
Tim Hurst 03/25/18

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Dancing Beyond Experiment

My study is to dance beyond what i know by preparing for the surprises in the movement of my physical body, my intention, emotion, and sensation. I work with energy as the basis for building signal networks in all these forms of movement.

I do this by working directly with the shift of focus between making specific connections to build signal networks and a focus on all energy connections happening at once.

Concentrating on the brain body ability to make distinctions between two connections, I concentrate on finding the simplest connections and vary the connections in one way to find new connections.

Dance is the perfect model for me to follow this process of simplicity growing into complexity by adding variation.

The principles of dance are directed toward this study of focus. The binary approach takes two realms of study and compares them. I am specifically interested in the variations between more and less force, circular and spiraled movement, extension and elevation of movement, directed action and imagery for moving energy.

My study is centered around my weaknesses of trying to force my movement and direct every action and my resistance to patterned and structured movement that seems to emphasize those weaknesses.

My process is derived from Ballet and Modern Dance and informed by study of many forms of technique, therapy, and improvisational dance.

Every day I set out with the goal to renew connections of energy and to discover new connections.

I lay on the floor and I stand. I move my entire body with each movement establishing support networks to move in every direction, with different levels of speed, intensity, and dynamic quality.

I use simple movements initiating from spine signals that go outward and inward.
i vary the directions of signals to go in the same and opposite directions.
I vary the movements from vertical with the spine to horizontal crossing the spine.

I establish a central image of spreading and elevating by following the action of my diaphragm expanding for inhaling and rising for the exhale. Then I transfer this image by pairing the breathing diaphragm with other diaphragms and platforms throughout my body.

I use spiral imagery of the double helix to enhance changing focus within continual movement and intimate relationships between different networks.

I check myself to make sure movement is a process of entering delight. If I am struggling and feeling strain, I simplify the connections and experiment with changes in the size and speed of my movements.
Tim Hurst 03/23/18

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Double Helix Dance Image

The double helix image is very helpful when I a learning new movement and when I am correcting old habits that create strain.

The problem I have is concentrating too much on one spiral at a time. My mind can conceive of only one spiral at a time unless I conceive the entire image at once slowly spiraling through my entire body. The image is applied only once from head to toe and allowed to move gently and continuously.

My thinking wants to follow a single spiral but that does not give me the agility to adjust. The problem this causes is I have to focus my specific thoughts on one area of movement.

The advantage of the double helix is that I can switch the entire image to a broader focus and allow it to operate as one part of my networking. The image itself does not require my attention or direction.

Rather than thinking the image, I can grasp the image as a whole and make slight adjustments to improve the range of my experience and my movement. Said another way, once the image is an active part of my entire networks, I can adjust a range of actions to affect the quality of my sensations and my movement.

My actions are first to adjust the shape of the double helix. I can narrow the space between the two spirals to surround specific vertebra and clarify signals to different areas of my body. I can expand the two spirals to the edges of my body for a more three dimensional experience and instant changes of direction and dynamic.

I then can add another specific image to the double helix since my focus already conceives of my full self in action. For example I can add the image of spreading and rising to specific horizontal areas of my body and emphasize the action with the double helix with larger and smaller space between the strands. I can connect the body sensations of my breathing diaphragm to the image of spreading and rising.

By adjusting specific areas of the double helix, I can connect platforms and diaphragms from my feet spreading and rising all the way through my body, up each spinal vertebra, through the top of my head. The double helix only has to be widened or narrowed in the areas that I am connecting.

All this is done while the full image is in continuous movement through my body. Any adjustments are making changes to the actions and connections of the double helix image.
Tim Hurst 03/07/18

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Ballet as Simple

The more stressed I become with running a business and worrying about money,the more I search for ways to release the stress in my body. It has taken many years to understand the instant relief that dance gives me.

Trying many forms of dance I decided that my body was not going to do what I asked it to do. So I became an improvisational dancer. I learned about the qualities of movement without worrying about precision.

Searching for more control of my body, I studied Pilates as a form of exercise based on Ballet and Modern Dance. I discovered that I do not have the concentration or the memory structure to make ten commands at once to make my body move correctly. Something was not connecting.

Then I discovered that Ballet simplified commands for my whole body into a network of movements. The very beginning movement, the plié, seems like simple movements of bending the legs, lowering the body, and lifting the arms. When I discovered the basis of this simple, whole body movement, I knew this was the clarity of learning I was looking for.

Pilates identified one principle of Ballet that looked hopeful. They call it the Core, meaning the musculature, nerves, blood flow, around the skeletal center of the body, the spine. Pilates strengthens and stretches the muscles around the spine using an exercise model.

When I began to take Ballet, the Core became related to movement of my whole body with simple commands. Those commands were signals originating at the spine. This sounds a little detailed but I had to have a way to connect my movements that seemed to ignore my commands.

The more I studied the simplest Ballet movements I realized three things. Ballet teaches movements as signals that start at different areas of the spine. A network of signals can move my whole body with one command. And third, when several networked movements are bundled as a phrase, I learn how the effort of one movement supports the next movement.

So my study of Ballet is to train my spine to send and receive signals that guide my body movements. This seems to work because my muscles surprise me by releasing to let the signals pass through.

An added benefit is that watching other dancers learn, I am able to identify the networks that should be connecting for me. For me to get to the networks, I have to go into much more detail than the average person. This drives my Pilates teachers crazy with so many questions and requests to understand what connects to what. Ballet teachers move us through the phrases and ask us to experiment with balance and different speeds to get the connections between movements and to build networks of signals.
Tim Hurst 02/07/18

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The Dancer’s Imprint

I have often wondered why the dancer has been satisfied to create intense experiences that are not recorded well even in photos and film.

My experience of dancers and their choreography is of their imprint as individuals and as groups. The imprint they create is every aspect of their experience as a person.

That imprint can not be reproduced mechanically. Their imprint is created within and in connection with fellow dancers, dance students, and audiences.

In neurobiology, this imprint is referred to as the mirror neuron. The mirror neuron not only records the experience of the dancer but also creates its own version of a sound from music or a movement from watching dance. This all sounds mysterious but it is a process that we respond to and recognize easily.

What the dancer is doing is sharing an imprint of their experience through their creation of dances. That imprint is replicated in many different ways in the fellow dancers, their dance students, their families and friends, and each audience that chooses to share that imprint.

This is of course only the beginning. Each person that experiences a dancer’s imprint reflects their own perspective by building on their excitement with slight variations. These different perspectives and moment by moment growth of delight and intensity are what we see as audiences.

Then as audience we amplify the delight, the anticipation, the excitement of the imprints we are witnessing. We are taking the dancers’ imprints and making our own which can explode into laughter or sighs or sometimes personal distress.

At the end of the performance, no person present is the same. Imprints have been created and recreated, shaped and reshaped. Each person’s experience has been expanded or compressed in some way.

This experience after a performance is often more than we can manage. Sometimes I do not know what to say or what to think about this new person I have become and my witness of new creations emerging before my eyes. What has just happened?

This is not the same thing that happens when watching a mechanical representation in media. In a live performance, I can access the real energy and the varying pathways taken by each dancer’s of their experience.

Basically, that performance with that group of dancers and that audience is a unique experience that will never happen in the same way again.
Tim Hurst. 02/06/18

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Sustenance in Melody

Singing today I fell in love with the overtones that connect a musical melody into a whole.

Since the qualities of dance and music is so close, I wonder what the connecting elements are for dance in a movement melody.

With musical overtones, the resonance of one tone fills the spaces of one note to the other. Their is a continual flowing movement no matter what rhythmic spaces occur for emphasis and anticipation.

Dancers also know how to fill a movement with different levels and qualities of resonance. Each movement, each part of the interconnected body, each cell and organ, fills with a resonant energy that continues like music through any rhythmic space into a melodic phrase.

Yet there is something more basic below the energy. That is the movement of the curve that dancers understand as connecting any transition from one movement to the next. The curve can be a loop that can double back into what seems like a line. The curve can be a continuous spiral that intertwines with other spirals from many areas of the body, the emotions, and the intentions of the person.

The basis is of course the wave that makes up sound and light. The wave like the dancer extends to a peak and rides the curve into a rejuvenating exhale before receiving another inhale at the lowest point to rise again.

Each point along the way connects in millions of ways with the next points changing direction into a fresh movement. The dancer studies the wave form as the sustenance between each movement and the sustainer of the melody creating an imprint of the individual and the group of dancers.
Tim Hurst 02/06/18