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My Urgency towards a Dynamic Vision of Dance

What is my urgency of exploring a Dynamic Vision of Dance?

Every day I wake up to hear of a new discovery about human intelligence, how the brain can be improved to take advantage of this emotional or athletic intelligence, and what substance in what kind of pill will instantly enhance my abilities.

The question that interests me is when has this kind of exponential growth happened before in our history? It may have happened many times after we as a species had lulls of discouragement and disillusionment.

Most probably a leap in human skills of this sort happened as the human began to accept their new powers of the brain. Most important though are the gifts the human developed before realizing the new powers. These gifts became strengths that made it possible to garner the courage and the commitment to explore and build on these new powers.

We seem to be in one of those discouraged seasons of history. Even with all our new discoveries, we look at our youth and find more anxiety, more suicides, more depression and more addiction to substances that we rely on to face our challenges.

One perspective that sticks out as something that has helped humans to persevere is a discovery by Steve Johnson. In his book Wonderland, How Play has Change the Course of History. He connects play to the experience of Delight.

The first question Johnson asks is why in the evolution of humans, the flute preceded the invention of fire. The sounds of the flute were intricately developed to produce a scale that is mathematically astounding. The answer he gives is that our ancestors explored the experience of Delight.

What gift did humans have to help deal with a larger brain? Delight. Where did the intricacies of math and astronomical observation come from? Delight

How did humans persevere in the discouraging times when changes were demanded and new powers seemed unwieldy? Delight was studied and practiced in three ways. Two of the activities were named in language as the same thing. Music and Dance were the same activity. Music and Dance and Religion held the same purpose. First it was Delight. From the delight came bonding of the group plus the growth of observation and anticipation. Most important was the growth all three brought to make phrases that captured the sense of the individual and the group. A phrase was a declaration of the hope and aspiration of each group in their search for the courage to persevere.

What is interesting in our times is our reliance on music and dance as ways to grow our Delight while at the same time not understanding their importance. They are relegated to the realm of religion that is not understood but exploited for the hope it gives.

What is my part in this urgent quest for an overall vision?

I have a unique history with music dance, and religion. All took me a long time to grasp. The technique was slow coming. My brain would freeze if I got over stimulated with each study.

My only entry point in to music, dance, or religion was Delight. Because of early trauma, I developed an escape hatch that was a kind of surrender to Delight. I discovered a particular kind of surrender that always brought Delight. Plus i was able to play and sing music with an abandon that I did not understand.

The tenants of religion were puzzling to me yet I felt myself abandon to Delight in meditative and ritual experiences.

An example of the difference is that learning music or dance has been a process of being a stick man with jerky movements and continual mistakes. Likewise, memory was not something I understood.

What I was able to do was to abandon myself to Delight by playing with the pieces of learning I could remember from a class. I could commit my pieces to memory by connecting each section to a specific kind of Delight.

I would often have lapses of memory while performing. There was no recorded memory of the music or the dance. I would improvise until the Delight would return and there was the remainder of the phrase, the tonality, or the melody.

So my study of Delight has a special meaning to me. Also I seek to understand the kind of surrender that brought me to enter Delight.

All these things are what dancers, musicians, and people of religion approach in their own ways. I have a very detailed perspective because it has all come to me through a longer time line than most.

For example, it took me six summers of daily swimming to learn how to coordinate legs and arms and breath in swimming. Tennis took about the same time just to hit a ball after I bounced it in front of me.

I will not admit the enormous length of time I have spent to arrive at an ease with music and dance. Religion took years of intense meditative practices to coordinate my readiness to my willingness. I persevered in order to both surrender and to reach for the courage to ask the real questions.
Tim Hurst 07/02/18

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What’s Movement to a Dancer?

What appears to be physical changes of position and poses is for the dancer a refining of complex networks of signals connecting, dissolving, and reconnecting throughout all the systems of the person.

These signals travel in curved pathways that have been understood by dancers for centuries and are now studied as Structural Integration. It is the curved pathways of signals that a dancer experiences as continuous movement of sensation, anticipation, initiation, completion, and transition into multiple directions at once.

The dancer’s tools of compression and extension are related to signals that are continuously in motion. What appears as stillness or a pause is actually another state of movement.

An audience can immediately identify the delight of a dancer’s simple movement. For the dancer also the movement is an instantaneous connection of physical, emotional, and intentional signals.

From the viewer’s point of view, the movement looks automatic as if a body memory has taken over. For the dancer, there is a rapid shifting of many kinds of focus. One type of focus is from the micro view to monitor a specific skill and the macro view of the entire person at once. Another type of focus is in the awareness which shifts the view from foreground to background.

Even though it may seem as if some movements are directed and others automatic, for the dancer patterns are variations of experience that work at levels sometimes called heightened awareness and sometimes requiring less attention. Both levels of the patterned skill are interconnecting with each other, the difference is the focus on foreground or background.

The dancer’s view is more of a malleable system that is in continual responsiveness. Automatic movement and muscle memory do not adequately explain their complex process.

For the viewer and often for the choreographer, the pattern is seen as a repetition, a replica of a specific movement. For the dancer, the pattern is also a malleable experience that is varied by the thoughts, emotions, and energy of the moment. This is one of the reasons that no two dance performances are the same.

Another astonishing perspective is the dancer’s ability to alter the experience of any movement with a set of modulators. A physical analogy is a musicians sound board. Any sound can be modulated and blended with dials that give more or less of different qualities.

The dancer modulates not just speed or duration but also the qualities that bring emphasis, heaviness or lightness, subtlety or boldness, to name only a few. Like the musician the outcome is a confluence of emotion and interpretation of melodies, rhythms, and harmonies.

Imagery is a tool to assist the dancer with the complexity of shifts in focus and with interconnecting the centers of movement, emotion, and formation of meaning. Signals are shaped and managed with imagery.

Also the anatomy of the body is managed with imagery. Physically, the dancer is also working with the body as a malleable system. To do this the dancer has developed imagery within a training processes for understanding the body movement.

Imagery is often indicating the direction of energy flows. Using the image of signals different areas of the body can be viewed as signal initiators and receptors. Rather than commanding a body part to move, the signal begins at a location and travels back and forth to other sites in the body. These specific locations are interconnected into networks.

Signals move between different areas of the body are called diaphragms and platforms. They usually cross the entire body and give the perspective of the dancer as moving three dimensionally and in every direction. Each one is a major sending and receiving point for many nerve endings and flows of energy.

The platforms are the arches and surfaces of the feet, the palms of the hands, the collar bone and scapula that suspend the shoulder girdle, the base of the skull, and the Fontanelles or meetings of the cranial bones at the top of the head.

The dancer makes detailed studies of each platform to refine the nerve and energy flows to and from each area. Then they connect their access to each by establishing networks between them.

The diaphragms are muscular and give clues to the dancer’s detailed training of large and small muscle groups. The diaphragms are the pelvic diaphragm also known as the pelvic floor, the lower rib cage diaphragm also known as the respiratory diaphragm, the mid chest diaphragm also known as the dancer’s diaphragm, and the Centrum Brain diaphragm with one known moving part the soft palate.

The diaphragms are the dancer’s keys to lifting up from feet to head, to spreading the body horizontally to engage front and back muscles, to arching and rotating the spine, to connecting the torso and the spine to movement of the legs and articulation of the knees, ankles, arches, and toes of the feet.

What difference does the dancer’s perspective make? Movement is a springing motion rather than a pounding one. A balance of extension and compression takes less effort and training goes past the desire to try too hard. The shifts of focus bring a sense of delight to movement. Every area of the body is accessible and trained as a supportive network.
Tim Hurst 10/09/17

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Healing My Trauma

My experiment today is to explore an area in my cranium that began healing in a CranioSacral Therapy with Maria Scotchell yesterday. I reexperienced an injury at birth when the physician used forceps to reposition me in the womb.

The two areas that I sense now are under my right ear and at the top left quadrant of my head. I began moving by bobbing the base of my skull around the top Atlas vertebra of my spine. My movement felt restricted. For whatever reason, I felt myself in open space.

Placing my hands gently on these two areas, I moved my head side to side. And then I entered a familiar experience when I allow my movement to follow any path it seems to follow. These pathways are usually what I know as the smallest curves becoming circles and spirals and loops. The movement is continuous and gently shifting toward every direction, rising and falling into any position or orientation.

These areas of experience are ones I have avoided or limited my awareness. To go into this memory obviously has created resistance in me because I now feel a reluctance to continue.

However, the free flow of curving motion is bringing me to an awareness of this entire complex experience and allowing me to release it. This may be a process I will repeat over time or maybe I will allow myself to decriminalize the sensations and memories involved.

The word decriminalize just came out of me. I may have been avoiding the experience by directing blame on myself. This reminds me of the experience of football players with head injuries who direct violence on themselves and others. What a process we assign ourselves!

Yet here it is. a movement that allowed me to accept and go past the experience. It is here that I ask if this free flow of motion in every direction and dimension is basic process of life. Am I replicating the movement within every cell?

Of course life is beyond the smallness of my system. After all it is my brain body coalition that says, “Stop. Do not go further.” Within the tussle of myself is the desire to both withhold from life and completely burn myself up with life’s energy.

I lay down for a nap in this, my early morning play. The sensation of falling through space brought out more questions. Unspeakable images of malleable shifts went beyond my simple concept of pathways and lines and circles. Continual responsiveness. Beyond yearning and resisting. Beyond my thought of a moving body. Beyond floating and malleability.

Within the experience is a knowing of personal response and receptivity. My inability to conceive this vastness and the complete interconnection of everything translates into an experience of personal care and a regeneration of life.
Tim Hurst 09/02/17

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Cymatics Rhythm Dance

I am very excited to discover Cymatics and the study of brain rhythms by Gilley at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Two areas jump out for me. One is multiple signal interconnections in the brain of the drummer and the other is the curved flows of energy between parts of the brain that establish networks of signals.

This is the clear language I am looking for in my study of signals networking the entire body in the study of dance.

Another exciting insight is the mathematical models that establish curves in the shape of the brain that verify a line through the center of the cranium, a cross-section of the brain.

This line is a mathematical model of what I refer to as the Centrum Cranial Diaphragm. I am interested in the ways dancers learn to pass signals through horizontal planes or diaphragms of the body and connect these diaphragms into signal networks.

These networks pass signals within and between diaphragms that build the interconnection of awareness and the creation and variation of patterned manifestations in movement, sound, and light.

My interest is in the fluid ability of musicians and dancers to create and continually reshape patterns in capsules that represent the complex nature of the human networks both individually and as groups. This is the work of the artist. I am delighted to see scientific research discover the importance of this process for activity in the brain and for the importance to understand learning and rehabilitation for all ages and types of humans.

With dancers, I believe that the areas of melody and rhythm are keys to all these studies. These studies of the brain rhythms are very exciting. Dance is important because all the complexity of the drummer’s motions and rhythms are being created within and outside the dancer. The dancer builds networks in each tiny area of the body and brain. These networks are called on to operate simultaneously in different directions with different intensities and coordinating all systems of sensation, emotion, intention, and continual support and repair.

In order to manage all this interconnected complexity, the dancer must also train the focus to shift between a micro and a macro view of all human systems. Understanding how the dancer does all this is my passion for looking into all realms of the experience of the dancer as well as the scientific and metaphysical study of those experiences.
Tim Hurst 08/25/17

Here are my notes from Cymatics and Brain Rhythms. My minimal understanding of science and math means I must catch the simplicity as I understand it in reference to my own study.

Cymatics
Oscillation of shape and sound
Water droplet levitations
2nd harmonic. Duple
3rd harmonic. Latin off beats
4th harmonic. Latin off beats in duple
5th harmonic. Equal emphasis all directions
6th harmonic. Equal shimmer in triple
7th harmonic. Shimmer in all directions
8th harmonic. Shimmer rhythm creates a circle

https://truth theory.com/2017/08/03/neuroscience-drumming-researchers-discover-secrets-drumming-humanbrain/

Rhythm and the Brain: Superorganism
Studies of the drummer’s brain.
Brain Rhythms: functional brain networks mediated by oscillating neural coupling
firing: synchronization: neural connectivity
Wave forms above and below a line: bottom up
Two areas of the brain establish a curved energy flow connecting below and then completing an ellipse connecting above.
Complete categorization of brain rhythms

My postulate of a Centrum Cranial Diaphragm
Line through the Cranium
Beginning at Brow between eyes: Top of soft palate: Temple area connecting Sphenoid internally and at Cranial Base: Pineal Gland: Hippocampus complex of brain: Completing at Occipital Sutures and Fourth Ventricle.

Sources used to support a Centrum Cranial Diaphragm
Cymatics identifying spirals as a basic shape in all nature from cells to universes and in all organisms: mathematical models that divide these spirals into ellipse and lines
Spiral in the Cranium: modeled as sets of triangles and One line passing through the center of the cranium edge to edge cross-section; through center of brain.
Tim Hurst 08/25/17