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Hovering Torso Prancing Legs

Today at the Lake Travis beach, Ginger and I went for a walk. I explored an experiment that had occurred to me two days ago. Today I identified what the image is.

My torso is hovering over my legs like a glider that is banking and swiveling in every direction. I was able to feel the hovering sensation because I had recently discovered what it really meant to lift the torso up away from the hips and legs. I had also not understood in Ballet class about the hips operating as a part of the legs.

The discoveries are so interesting because I am fascinated by the way a dancer initiates any movement with a sense of delight. Also I am convinced that dancers training and personal imagery is directed towards clarifying the signals that pass through the body.

This is important for me today because I have strained all the muscles on the right side of my torso. Sarah Brumgart a dancer turned massage therapist spent an afternoon identifying all those aching and painful muscle connections that I could not bring my self to stretch.

This particular experiment was important because I began signals at the lower torso and passed signals through the most painful areas to areas of the back that could easily move.

My hovering torso seems to originate in the suspended diaphragm under my arms in the back. Dana Lewis distinguishes the movement across this area as spreading which is an expansive, extending movement.

With a lifting motion, that Dana also insisted I learn, I initiate a supportive network of signals from the pelvic floor that connect under my ribs all around my body. Shifting the focus of my upper torso felt fluid and made it easy to tilt to a diagonal and bank into a turn that curved my entire body all the way around.

The amazing sensation was that all this movement is initiated in the hovering torso. My legs were tripping along following the movement coming from above. I lifted my torso as if it were independent of my legs and my legs felt free to spring quickly to catch the fluidity of my torso.

This is entirely different from the way I walk. I could not imagine returning to my usual heavy lumbering ahead movement lifting and lowering my legs. As subtle and small as my movements were, my legs felt as if they were flying, a similar image to hovering in my torso.

Of course, my sensation of seeing and thinking was different as well. This is harder to describe. My eye brows expanded. The base of my skull pulled a little up and slightly back freeing also my top vertebra to tilt and bob with every movement.

All these movements reminded me of an experimentation I did with the image of the Gypsy Poney. I paired the movement of my feet springing while lifting the back of my head like the bowing of the Poney’s neck. This is a new sensation of pairiing prancing feet with a raised and arched neck.

My focus widened at my brow and I notice the sensation of my upper torso riding above, like the hovering image, while my feet pranced lightly changing direction easily. My widening focus was a different state of connection between movement, thought, perception, and emotion.
Tim Hurst 10/16/17